“The justification for a university is that it preserves the connection between knowledge and the…”

“The justification for a university is that it preserves the connection between knowledge and the zest of life, by uniting the young and the old in the imaginative consideration of learning.”

Alfred North Whitehead, The Aims of Education

“For successful education there must always be a certain freshness in the knowledge dealt with. It…”

“For successful education there must always be a certain freshness in the knowledge dealt with. It must be either new in itself or invested with some novelty of application to the new world of new times.”

Alfred North Whitehead, The Aims of Education

“The very corner-stone of an education intended to form great minds, must be the recognition of the…”

“The very corner-stone of an education intended to form great minds, must be the recognition of the principle, that the object is to call forth the greatest possible quantity of intellectual power, and to inspire the intensest love of truth.”

John Stuart Mill, “Civilization”, London and Westminster Review (April 1836)

“Despite my relatively early disillusionment with Platonism, I am very glad that I spent all those…”

“Despite my relatively early disillusionment with Platonism, I am very glad that I spent all those years reading philosophy books. For I learned something that still seems very important: to distrust the intellectual snobbery which originally led me to read them.”

Richard Rorty, Philosophy and Social Hope

“All poetry is supposed to be instructive but in an unnoticeable manner; it is supposed to make us…”

“All poetry is supposed to be instructive but in an unnoticeable manner; it is supposed to make us aware of what it would be valuable to instruct ourselves in; we must deduce the lesson on our own, just as with life.”

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, “Letter to Carl Friedrich Zelter (26 November 1825)”

“It is a noble and beautiful spectacle to see man raising himself, so to speak, from nothing by his…”

“It is a noble and beautiful spectacle to see man raising himself, so to speak, from nothing by his own exertions; dissipating, by the light of reason, all the thick clouds in which he was by nature enveloped; mounting above himself; soaring in thought even to the celestial regions; like the sun, encompassing with giant strides the vast extent of the universe; and, what is still grander and more wonderful, going back into himself, there to study man and get to know his own nature, his duties and his end.”

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Discourse on the Arts and Sciences

“They who love to inform themselves, are never idle. Though I have no business of consequence to take…”

“They who love to inform themselves, are never idle. Though I have no business of consequence to take care of, I am nevertheless continually employed. I spend my life in examining things: I write down in the evening whatever I have remarked, what I have seen, and what I have heard in the day: every thing engages my attention, and every thing excites my wonder: I am like an infant, whose organs, as yet tender, are strongly affected by the slightest objects.”

Montesquieu, Persian Letters

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