Lucid Dreaming

Lucid dreaming is being aware that you are dreaming. Typically, this occurs in the middle of a regular dream. Often the actual theme of the dream is beyond the individual’s control. However, it may be possible to influence the dream – to change the characters or course of events – including the ending of an unpleasant dream.

Suggested steps for becoming aware of, and increasing the frequency, of lucid dreams include:

1. In the daytime, when you’re fully awake, stop ask yourself the question: “Am I dreaming?” In time, you should find that you’ll also start to ask that question in the middle of a dream.

2. Keep a dream journal. Keep a pen and paper next to your bed so you can record any dreams you have. You should do this immediately on wakening up. This can help you to identify some common themes, people, places, situations or events that you often seen to dream about. Since these are unique and specific to your dreams, they’ll act as triggers to alert you when you’re dreaming.

3. Notice when you are more likely to be dreaming. Research shows that we are most likely to have a lucid dream during a nap, a few hours after waking, and usually in the morning. Also, lucid dreams are common during REM sleep – which is most pronounced at the end of a night’s sleep.

4. Experiment with Laberge’s lucid dreaming technique. Basically, this suggests that you set your alarm for 4 ½ or 6 hours after falling asleep. When the alarm goes off, write down as much about your dream as you can remember. Then, while you are lying in bed relaxed, imagine that you are back in that dream. Tell yourself, “I will know that I am dreaming when I fall asleep again”. This usually increases the chances that you will have a lucid dream.

“Academic philosophy is burdened with the disadvantage which philosophy as a profession imposes on…”

“Academic philosophy is burdened with the disadvantage which philosophy as a profession imposes on philosophy as the free investigation of truth, or which philosophy by government order imposes on philosophy in the name of nature and mankind.”

Arthur Schopenhauer, “On Philosophy in the Universities”, Parerga and Paralipomena

“This tremendous world I have inside of me. How to free myself, and this world, without tearing…”

“This tremendous world I have inside of me. How to free myself, and this world, without tearing myself to pieces. And I’d rather tear myself to a thousand pieces than be buried with this world within me.”

Franz Kafka, Diaries of Franz Kafka

“Every philosophical, ethical, and political idea — its lifeline connecting it with its historical…”

“Every philosophical, ethical, and political idea — its lifeline connecting it with its historical origins having been severed — has a tendency to become the nucleus of a new mythology, and this is one of the reasons why the advance of enlightenment tends at certain points to revert to superstition and paranoia. The majority principle… has become the sovereign force to which thought must cater. It is a new god, not in the sense in which the heralds of the great revolutions conceived it, namely, as a power of resistance to existing injustice, but as a power of resistance to anything that does not conform.”

Max Horkheimer, Eclipse of Reason

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